SATs 2017

Key Stage 1 National Curriculum Assessments (SATs) From 2016

In the summer term of 2016, the children in Year 2 were the first to take the new SATs papers. These tests in English and mathematics  reflected the new National Curriculum, and were significantly more rigorous and challenging for the children and will continue to be so. There is also be a completely new marking scheme to replace the existing National Curriculum levels.

Instead of the old National Curriculum levels, children will be given a scaled score.

Key Stage 1 Reading

The new reading test for Year 2 pupils will involve two separate papers:

Paper 1 consists of a selection of texts totalling 400 to 700 words, with questions interspersed

Paper 2 comprises a reading booklet of a selection of passages totalling 800 to 1100 words. Children will write their answers in a separate booklet

Each paper should take around 30 minutes, but children will not be strictly timed, as the tests are not intended to assess children’s ability to work at speed. The texts in the reading papers will cover a range of fiction, non-fiction and poetry, and will get progressively more difficult towards the end of the test. Teachers will have the option to stop the test at any point that they feel is appropriate for a particular child.

There will be a variety of question types:

Multiple choice

Ranking/ordering, e.g. ‘Number the events below to show in which order they happened in the story’

Matching, e.g. ‘Match the character to the job that they do in the story’

Labelling, e.g. ‘Label the text to show the title’

Find and copy, e.g. ‘Find and copy one word that shows what the weather was like in the story’

Short answer, e.g. ‘What does the bear eat?’

Open-ended answer, e.g. ‘Why did Lucy write the letter to her grandmother? Give two reasons’

Key stage 1 grammar, spelling and punctuation

Children taking Key Stage 1 SATs will sit two separate papers in grammar, spelling and punctuation:

Paper 1: a grammar, punctuation and vocabulary test, in two sections of around 10 minutes each (with a break between, if necessary), worth 20 marks. This will involve a mixture of selecting the right answers e.g. through multiple choice, and writing short answers.

Paper 2: a 20-word spelling test taking approximately 15 minutes and worth 10 marks.

Key Stage 1 mathematics

The main difference to the format of the papers is the change to include a separate arithmetic paper.

The questions in the Key Stage 1 mathematics tests will be taken from the new National Curriculum and will include a variety of work from Years 1 and 2.

There will be a mixture of question types from across the curriculum:

The arithmetic test will contain questions from the Number and Place Value, Calculations and Fractions sections of the curriculum.

Paper 2 will contain questions from the Number, Counting and Place Value, Calculations, Fractions, Measurement, Geometry and Statistics sections of the curriculum.

The arithmetic test is made up of purely sums and calculations.

Paper 2 will include oral questions at the beginning of the paper and will also put more of an emphasis on problem solving skills and reasoning.

There will be a mixture of question levels. There will no longer be any “extended papers” (equivalent to the Level 3 papers).

Each test is developed so that there is scope for higher attaining pupils to show their strengths.

Some differences from previous SATs:

The introduction of an arithmetic paper

There is an increased demand in the new curriculum when working with fractions which goes beyond halves and quarters and onto fractions of amounts eg. ¾ of 20

There will be more demanding subtraction eg. 55-17

Greater knowledge of mathematical vocabulary is required eg. Vertices

Rotation is new to the curriculum

Knowledge of commutative facts e.g.

2 + 6 = 6 + 2 true

5 x 6 = 6 x 5 true

6 – 2 = 2 – 6 false

Working marks are new to KS1 for all children (problem solving with more than 1 step)

Children need to read time to 5 minute intervals

All children take both papers (no higher tier paper)

No equipment allowed

Scaled scores and reporting of the new assessments

The reporting will change. As the use of levels (such as 2a, 3b, 4c) has been discontinued, they will now be using a scaled scoring system to standardise the results.

The scale will have a lower end point below 100 and an upper end point above 100 (with 100 being the national standard). Once the national standard has been set, a statistical technique called ‘scaling’ will transform the raw score into a scaled score. This will be published after the first tests have been administered.

The old National Curriculum levels are not relevant to the new National Curriculum. However, in order to provide schools with some indication of the new standards, the standards agency has tried to indicate equivalence in a broad sense. At KS1 the national standard will roughly equate to an old level 2b. At KS2 this will roughly equate to an old level 4b. Otherwise levels and scaled scores will not be comparable.

KS2 test results were published in July 2016. Each pupil registered for the tests received:

a raw score (number of raw marks awarded)

a scaled score

confirmation of whether or not they attained the national standard

In the past, level 6 tests have been produced for pupils who can demonstrate attainment above level 5. There are no separate tests for the most able from 2016. Instead each test is developed so that there is scope for higher attaining pupils to show their strengths.

Key Stage 2 National Curriculum Assessments (SATs) From 2016

In the summer term of 2016, the children in Year 6 were the first to take the new SATs papers. These tests in English and mathematics reflected the new National Curriculum, and were significantly more rigorous and challenging for the children and will continue to be so.

There is also be a completely new marking scheme to replace the existing National Curriculum levels. Instead of the old National Curriculum levels, children will be given a scaled score.

At the end of Year 6, children will be tested on:

Reading

Mathematics

Spelling, punctuation and grammar

These tests will be both set and marked externally, and the results will be used to measure the school’s performance (for example, through reporting to Ofsted and published league tables). Your child’s marks will be used in conjunction with teacher assessment to give a broader picture of their attainment.

Key Stage 2 Reading

The reading test will be a single paper with questions based on three passages of text. Your child will have one hour, including reading time, to complete the test.

There will be a selection of question types, including:

Ranking/ordering

Labelling

Find and copy

Short constructed response

Open-ended response, e.g. ‘Look at the sentence that begins Once upon a time. How does the writer increase the tension throughout this paragraph? Explain fully, referring to the text in your answer.’

Key Stage 2 grammar, punctuation and spelling test

The grammar, punctuation and spelling test will consist of two parts: a grammar and punctuation paper requiring short answers, lasting 45 minutes, and an aural spelling test of 20 words, lasting around 15 minutes.

The grammar and punctuation test will include two sub-types of questions:

Selected response, e.g. ‘Identify the adjectives in the sentence below’

Constructed response, e.g. ‘Correct/complete/rewrite the sentence below,’ or, ‘The sentence below has an apostrophe missing. Explain why it needs an apostrophe.’

Key Stage 2 mathematics

The main difference to the format of the papers is the change from a mental arithmetic paper to an arithmetic paper. This change means that the Key Stage 2 Arithmetic test will no longer have an audio recording of the questions, but the questions will be written on the paper instead. The sample materials for the 2016 papers show the response boxes with squared paper to allow for working out.

There will be 3 papers. The format is as follows:

Paper 1: Arithmetic paper, 30 minutes, 30 marks

Papers 2 and 3: Both papers are reasoning papers. They are both non-calculator, 40 minutes for each paper, 40 marks for each paper

Total = 110 marks

Permitted equipment:

pencil and rubber for the arithmetic paper

pencil , rubber, ruler, protractor and mirror for the reasoning papers

The questions in the Key Stage 2 maths tests will be taken from the new National Curriculum and will include a variety of work from Year 3, Year 4, Year 5 and Year 6.

There will be a mixture of question types from across the curriculum:

The arithmetic test will contain questions from the Number and Place Value, Calculations, Fractions, Ratio and Proportion and Algebra sections of the curriculum.

Papers 2 and 3 will contain questions from the Number and Place Value, Calculations, Fractions, Ratio and Proportion, Algebra, Measurement, Geometry and Statistics sections of the curriculum.

The arithmetic test is made up of sums and calculations. Papers 2 and 3 will put more of an emphasis on problem solving and reasoning skills.

There will be a mixture of question levels. This includes not just different levels of ability, but also different levels of complexity. So, some questions will involve more steps than others, or might involve more than 1 maths topic. This way, they make sure it’s not just “straight-forward” maths, but also includes problem solving and reasoning ability.

Some differences from previous SATs:

The mental arithmetic paper will be replaced by an “Arithmetic Paper”

On the arithmetic paper, questions will not be read out on an audio recording. Instead, the questions will be written on the paper (with squared paper response boxes to allow for calculations).

The arithmetic paper also includes fractions

Introduction of addition, subtraction, multiplication and division using fractions is new to the curriculum e.g.

2/3 ÷ 2

½ x ¾

Most questions will be worth 1 mark but longer calculations, such as long multiplication or long division will be worth 2 marks and only the formal written methods will get the method mark.

There is the inclusion of more complex 3 mark questions (these were only in the level 6 paper previously).

All children will take all papers. There will no longer be any “extended papers” (equivalent to current Level 6 papers).

Each test is developed so that there is scope for higher attaining pupils to show their strengths.

No tracing paper will be permitted.

Scaled scores and reporting of the new assessments

The reporting will change. As the use of levels (such as 2a, 3b, 4c) has been discontinued, they will now be using a scaled scoring system to standardise the results.

The scale will have a lower end point below 100 and an upper end point above 100 (with 100 being the national standard). Once the national standard has been set, a statistical technique called ‘scaling’ will transform the raw score into a scaled score. This will be published after the first tests have been administered.

The old National Curriculum levels are not relevant to the new National Curriculum. However, in order to provide schools with some indication of the new standards, the standards agency has tried to indicate equivalence in a broad sense. At KS1 the national standard will roughly equate to an old level 2b. At KS2 this will roughly equate to an old level 4b. Otherwise levels and scaled scores will not be comparable.

KS2 test results will be published in July 2016. Each pupil registered for the tests will receive:

a raw score (number of raw marks awarded)

a scaled score

confirmation of whether or not they attained the national standard

In the past, level 6 tests have been produced for pupils who can demonstrate attainment above level 5. There are no separate tests for the most able from 2016. Instead each test is developed so that there is scope for higher attaining pupils to show their strengths.